Mesothelioma and Other Professions Affected by This Disease

by Andrew Miller on January 18, 2013

  • SumoMe

Though rare, mesothelioma, a form of cancer that affects the lining of internal organs, is extremely devastating. It is most often seen in the bodies of people who have had long term exposure to asbestos and normally does not develop until about twenty to fifty years after exposure has taken place. Because asbestos was used widely in North America during the 20th century, it can be found almost everywhere across the United States. It is a naturally occurring mineral resistant to heat, water, and chemicals which has led it to be used in many consumer goods.

There are several professions that have experienced more asbestos exposure than others, putting people employed in these occupations at a higher risk for developing mesothelioma. People who have developed mesothelioma as a result of workplace exposure to asbestos often receive monetary compensation for their illness after seeking legal action.

Mining: The Profession Most at Risk

One of the riskiest professions where workers are estimated to have received the most asbestos exposure overall is mining. Many miners in the United States have tested positive for mesothelioma as a result of the asbestos they were exposed to while mining other materials. Though they were not specifically mining asbestos, the substances that they were mining have been shown to be contaminated with asbestos, causing severe health issues over time. This specific type of asbestos exposure has been traced most frequently to two mines: one in New York and the other in Montana that showed high levels of asbestos in the mined substances. Mesothelioma has also been linked to the family members of these individuals, possibly due to traces of asbestos on their clothing.

Other High Risk Occupations

Though mining is considered to be the profession with the greatest risk of mesothelioma, other industries do prove to have high rates of it as well. The most dangerous professions after mining are the construction trades where workers are working in small areas. These are often high exposure points for asbestos. Specifically hazardous are professions such as ship building, railroad work, manufacturing, steel works, painters and even school teaching because asbestos was used in the construction of the majority of schools in the 20th century. Most of the people in these professions and occupations similar to these have handled asbestos directly during the course of their careers, which can lead to mesothelioma.

Indirect Exposure to Asbestos

Occupational conditions that allow mesothelioma to develop are also present in professions such as automobile technicians, building inspectors, contractors, textile workers and building engineers. In these cases and instances like them, workers were likely indirectly exposed to asbestos through the atmosphere.

If you suspect that you have been exposed to asbestos and that you are at risk for developing mesothelioma, it is important that you vigilantly monitor your health for any symptoms of mesothelioma and that you have regular check ups with your doctor to ensure you do not have the disease. If you are struggling through a mesothelioma diagnosis because of workplace exposure to asbestos, it would be wise for you to contact an attorney to inquire about the possibility of receiving monetary compensation.

If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with mesothelioma as a result to asbestos exposure, it is important to seek legal representation immediately because you may have a claim.  Belluck & Fox, LLP is a New York law firm that works hard to represent individuals suffering from Mesothelioma because of on-the-job asbestos exposure.  For more information, visit the website at www.MesotheliomaHelp.net.

Andrew Miller
Andrew Miller is an experienced Social Media expert and Author. He has worked in marketing for over a decade and finds his passion in bringing concepts to life for the world to enjoy. He is also an avid legal blogger and currently working on a book with his wife about social entrepreneurship. He is a true Socialpreneur and finds that his goal in life is to be an agent for positive social change through both his writing and business endeavors.
Andrew Miller

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