What are your options if you’re falsely accused of a crime at work?

by Redmans Solicitors on August 21, 2012

  • SumoMe

If you’ve been accused of a crime at work then this can be extremely confusing and is bound to be stressful to you. It can, in the worst case scenario, lead to you losing your job. You’ll want to get advice from expert unfair dismissal solicitors to ensure that you’re making the right decisions and can protect your position if the situation turns nasty. However, it’s equally important that you’re aware of your rights and what the outcome may potentially be if you’re accused of a crime at work. In this post we’ll therefore look at the following issues:

  1. What should you do if you’re accused of a crime at work
  2. What the potential consequences are if you’re accused of a crime at work

What should you do if you’re accused of a crime at work

If you’ve been accused of a crime at work then you should cooperate appropriately with your employer and (if necessary) the police. Your employer should hold an investigation into the allegations that have been made against you and a fair and impartial manager should conduct the investigation. You should be interviewed and asked to explain your position. Your employer doesn’t necessarily have to wait until the outcome of the police investigation to hold their own investigation and disciplinary procedures . However, your employer should make reasonable and appropriate enquiries with the appropriate persons to determine whether they reasonably, honestly and genuinely believe that you are guilty of the offence that you have been accused of. Further, you should obtain expert legal advice from London employment lawyers or, alternatively, visit your local Citizens Advice Bureau to determine what you should do.

What the potential consequences are if you’re accused of a crime at work

The worst case scenario in such matters is that you’re dismissed without notice. However, in deciding to dismiss you your employer must consider:

  1. The nature of your employment
  2. The position held by you
  3. The nature of the incident
  4. The effect on the employer, on their customers and on their fellow employees
  5. Your past record
  6. Your proximity to members of the public

If your offence has an adverse impact on your employer’s business then a decision to dismiss may be fair. If you intend to plead not guilty then you will probably be suspended (this may be with or without pay) and an investigation will occur. This may result in your exoneration or your dismissal. Your employer may offer you a compromise agreement solicitors will have to give you independent expert legal advice. However, if you are dismissed then your dismissal must have been within the range of reasonable responses in the circumstances and your investigation and disciplinary must have been conduct in a fair and impartial manner.

Redmans specialise in no win no fee unfair dismissal cases and offer employment law advice.

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